Signs and Symptoms of Skin Cancer – When to see a doctor

In this article we will look at possible symptoms of skin cancer and when you should go and see your doctor.

Spot or sore?

You should have a spot checked if you are concerned about it. This could be because the spot is new, doesn’t go away or looks unusual, it may have changed shape or size.

Look out for a spot or sore that hurts, is itchy, crusty, scabs over or bleeds for more than 4 weeks.

Skin tag, wart or mole?

What is the difference? Whilst none of them cause a risk to your health they’re annoying. So, if you want to know what you’re dealing with before you schedule a spot removal, here’s how to tell the difference between a mole, a wart, and a skin tag:

Warts pop up on your hands, knees, or the bottom of your feet. Unlike moles, they’re hard bumps that lie deep in the skin. Although they may be smooth on top, they’re thick, scaly, and callus-like underneath. Warts start from a virus. And like all viruses, they’re contagious. So, when you see a wart pop up, that means you came into contact with someone else with a wart virus.

A lump

This might be small, slow growing, shiny and pink or red.

Red patches on your skin

These red patches could also be itchy. This could be due to other non cancerous skin conditions. But get it checked to make sure.

Looking for signs of skin cancer

Non melanoma skin cancers tend to develop most often on skin that’s exposed to the sun.

To spot skin cancers early, it helps to know how your skin normally looks. That way, you’ll notice any changes more easily.

Possible signs and symptoms of melanoma

The most important warning sign of melanoma is a new spot on the skin or a spot that is changing in size, shape, or color.

The ABCDE rule is another guide to the usual signs of melanoma. Be on the lookout and tell your doctor about spots that have any of the following features:

  • A is for Asymmetry: One half of a mole or birthmark does not match the other.
  • B is for Border: The edges are irregular, ragged, notched, or blurred.
  • C is for Color: The color is not the same all over and may include different shades of brown or black, or sometimes with patches of pink, red, white, or blue.
  • D is for Diameter: The spot is larger than 6 millimeters across although melanomas can sometimes be smaller than this.
  • E is for Evolving: The mole is changing in size, shape, or color.

Some melanomas don’t fit these rules. It’s important to tell your doctor about any changes or new spots on the skin, or growths that look different from the rest of your moles.

If you are interested in discussing your treatment options, speak to www.theloc.com who are top skin cancer specialists. They’re there to help you every step of the way.